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What Do You Mean My Claim Is Capped? Ninth Circuit Ruling Further Clarifies Types Of Damages Excluded From A Landlord’s Claim In Bankruptcy

March 2, 2017

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The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals recently provided landlords dealing with a rejected lease with further guidance on the size and basis of their claims against a tenant’s bankruptcy estate.  Kupfer v. Salma (In re Kupfer), No. 14-16697 (9th Cir. Dec. 29, 2016).  The Ninth Circuit held that the statutory cap – 11 U.S.C. § 502(b)(6) – on a landlord’s claims against a tenant arising from lease rejection in bankruptcy applies only to claims that result directly from the lease termination; the cap does not apply to collateral claims.

The Statutory Cap in Bankruptcy Code Section 502(b)(6)

Bankruptcy Code Section 502(b)(6) caps a landlord’s claim for damages for a lease terminated before or during the tenant’s bankruptcy to (a) the greater of (i) one year’s worth of rent or (ii) 15%, not to exceed three years, of the remaining lease term; plus (b) any

Creditors Beware: Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals Expands Purview Of Potential FDCPA Violations And Furthers Circuit Split

October 23, 2016

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In Daugherty v. Convergent Outsourcing, Inc., No. 15-20392 (5th Cir. Sept. 8, 2016) the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals recently joined the circuit split interpreting the Fair Debt Collections Practices Act (“FDCPA”) in a way that further limits debts collectors.

Under the FDCPA the term “debt collectors” is not limited to those collecting debts for others –  certain creditors collecting debts directly owed to them can be bound by the FDCPA.   This statute prohibits debt collectors from using “false, deceptive, or misleading representation or means in connection with the collection of any debt.”  A debt collector who violates the FDCPA can be forced to pay actual damages, costs, reasonable attorney’s fees and up to $1,000 of additional damages if the plaintiff is an individual or up to $500,000 or one percent of the debt collector’s net worth in a class action.

In Daugherty, the Fifth Circuit considered whether

Defending A Preference Action – Can You Setoff Post-Petition Amounts Owed by the Debtor Against Your Preference Liability?

September 21, 2016

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All bankruptcy lawyers (and most long-suffering trade creditors) know that creditors who receive payments from a debtor within the “preference period” – 90 days before a voluntary bankruptcy case was filed, or 1 year if the creditor is an “insider” of the debtor – are at risk of lawsuit to return those payments to the bankruptcy estate. Pre-petition claims the creditor hold are no automatic defense.  However, the Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware recently ruled, as a matter of first impression in that Court, that an allowed post-petition claim of the creditor can be used to set off the creditor’s preference liability. See Official Comm. of Unsecured Creditors of Quantum Foods, LLC v. Tyson Foods, Inc. (In re Quantum Foods, LLC), 2016 WL 4011727 (Bankr. D. Del. Jul. 25, 2016).  Here is a copy of the case.

The background of the case is simple. The

Bankruptcy Courts Closing In – Will An Agreement Requiring Unanimous Consent To File For Bankruptcy Be Effective?

Magnifying Glass and document close up

We’ve all seen it.  The business opportunity looks enticing but is laced with risk about a potential bankruptcy filing down the road.  As bankruptcy lawyers we are often asked how deals can be structured to prevent a potential bankruptcy filing.  One approach (really, about the only approach, and it has its own risks) has been to structure the deal requiring unanimous member/manager/director consent to place the entity into bankruptcy but meanwhile adding a member/manager/director who may vote against taking the entity into bankruptcy in the future, or who may have interests and motives other than those of insiders.

Two recent bankruptcy court decisions have called this practice into question, especially when this corporate structure is implemented when the company is in distress.  The Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware

Will your claim in bankruptcy withstand the test?

Within the past year bankruptcy courts and federal courts adjudicating bankruptcy appeals have further developed the law governing claims in bankruptcy which are generally governed by Sections 501 and 502 of Title 11 of the United States Code (the “Bankruptcy Code”) and related Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure. Below is a discussion regarding two distinct cases that discuss the validity and priority of claims in bankruptcy.

Consumer Debt Buyers Beware: Think Before Filing A Proof of Claim

The Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals held that a Chapter 13 debtor could prosecute an adversary proceeding against a consumer debt buyer for violating the Fair Debt Collections Practices Act (“FDCPA”) based on the creditor filing a proof of claim on debt which was uncollectible under the Alabama statute of limitations. Crawford v. LVNV Funding, LLC, 758 F.3d 1254 (11th Cir. 2014).

It appears the Eleventh Circuit’s decision comes in response to a

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