In some good news for commercial vendors, the Supreme Court of Texas recently ruled that payments for ordinary services provided to an insolvent customer are not recoverable as fraudulent transfers, even if the customer turns out to be a “Ponzi scheme” instead of a legitimate business.

In Janvey v. Golf Channel, Inc.,[1] the Court considered whether, under the Texas Uniform Fraudulent Transfer Act (“TUFTA”), a vendor should be required to return payments it received in good faith for services rendered simply because its customer turned out to be a Ponzi scheme and not a lawful business.[2]  Ultimately, the Court determined that the objective market value of services provided in the ordinary course of business serves as a defense to a fraudulent transfer claim, despite the illegitimate nature of the Ponzi scheme. In reaching that conclusion, the Court rejected the contention that the