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Second Circuit: Market Rate Preferred Over Formula Rate For Purposes of Secured Creditor Cramdown in Chapter 11 Issues

Courts and professionals have wrestled for years with the appropriate approach to use in setting the interest rate when a debtor imposes a chapter 11 plan on a secured creditor and pays the creditor the value of its collateral through deferred payments under section 1129(b)(2)(A)(i)(II) of the Bankruptcy Code.  Secured lenders gained a major victory on October 20, 2017, when the Second Circuit Court of Appeals concluded that a market rate of interest is preferred to a so-called “formula approach” in chapter 11, when an efficient market exists.  In re MPM Silicones (Momentive), LLC, 2017 WL 4700314 (2d Cir. Oct. 20, 2017).

In Momentive, the bankruptcy court categorically dismissed expert testimony presented by the lenders to demonstrate a market rate of 5-6+%.  Because the debtor had offered to cash out the lenders (and prepared to borrow the funds necessary to do it), there was direct evidence of the economic terms on which an arm’s-length lender would have been willing to make a loan similar to the obligation held by the lenders after confirmation of the plan.  The bankruptcy court declined to consider this evidence, instead relying on a formula approach offered by the debtor, which started with a

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From Across the Pond – Dissipation of Assets May be Tort Under English Law: Marex Financial Limited v. Garcia [2017] EWHC918

Editor’s Note from The Bankruptcy Cave:  Our good colleagues Robert Dougans and Tatyana Talyanskaya from BC’s London office published this earlier in the summer, and we could not wait to add it to your autumn reading list.  The lesson here is powerful – England, the birthplace of the common law, comes through again to right an injustice where traditional legal principles might otherwise fall short.  Many of you readers have often dealt with defendants playing a shell game with their assets.  The Marex decision provides a powerful response – an independent tort against the individuals who perpetrated the asset stripping, instead of a pursuing a daisy-chain of subsidiaries and affiliates, all bereft of assets.  We at The Bankruptcy Cave applaud this decision – for every right, there shall be a remedy! 

There is a joke that freezing injunctions are dangerous to heath.  They appear to be carcinogenic, as people subject to them often tell the Court they are too ill to engage with proceedings.  (Observation of such defendants may provide heartwarming evidence for miracle cures.)  They also appear to cause amnesia, as defendants somehow forget to disclose the existence of

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BC Healthcare Restructuring Update: R CSR’s O-U-T? Less U.S. Gov’t $$ = More 11s . . . ?

Ok, if your attention span is anything like ours, all this wonky stuff about the ins and outs of the Affordable Care Act (or “ObamaCare,” as most of us know it) causes your eyes to glaze over and makes your mind wander to simpler topics, like who will win Dancing with the Stars, whether the Will & Grace reboot can make it, or how Luke may soon be revealed as the most evil Jedi of all.

But trust us, faithful reader, and you can, in about three short minutes, become a whiz on last week’s latest change to ObamaCare, which we think will lead to a lot more healthcare-related restructuring activity. So here is the 411 on last week’s termination of ObamaCare’s so-called “CSR Subsidies,” and its impact on our precarious, bankruptcy-prone, healthcare marketplace.  All presented to you in easy-to-follow FAQs!

What is a CSR Subsidy?

The federal government calls them “Cost-Sharing Reduction Subsidies.” In short, a key part of ObamaCare had the federal government give cash to insurers.  In turn, insurers used that money – the CSR Subsidy – to lower all ObamaCare premiums, and also reduce out-of-pockets and deductibles

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No Notice: How Unnotified Creditors Can Violate a Discharge Injunction

Here is the scenario: You are a creditor.  You hold clear evidence of a debt that is not disputed by the borrower, an individual.  That evidence of debt could be in the form of a note, credit agreement or simply an invoice.  You originated the debt, or perhaps instead it was transferred to you — it does not matter for this scenario.  At some point the borrower fails to pay on the debt when due.  For whatever reason, months or even years pass before you initiate collection efforts.

Finally, you seek to collect on the unpaid debt. Those collection efforts include letters and phone calls, and maybe even personal contact, all of which are ignored.  Then you employ an investigator and an attorney.  You eventually obtain a default judgment from a state court, which the borrower (unsurprisingly) refuses to pay.  You then garnish the borrower’s wages to pay the debt.  You collect a few payments before the borrower informs you that the debt was discharged in bankruptcy.  Wait . . . how could that be?  You never received notice of the bankruptcy, you didn’t have an opportunity to file a proof of claim, until now you never saw the discharge order. 

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The Jevic Files Continue: Pioneer-ing the Post-Jevic Era, and Wondering if Jevic Altered Critical Vendor Theory After All?

"Obsolete nautical chart with a compass and a coiled rope. Copy space on the nautical chart.N.B. the chart background used in this image is obsolete. To see more of my compass images, click the link below."

Editors’ Note:  The Supreme Court’s Jevic ruling last spring remains a treasure trove of bankruptcy theory, suitable for the novice bankruptcy student and highly instructional for those of us who have practiced in chapter 11 for years.  We at The Bankruptcy Cave like it so much that we will be offering a few more posts in upcoming weeks on the lower courts’ interpretation of Jevic since the spring, the continued efforts in Delaware to sidestep Jevic, and other important learning from the case.  Here, our co-editor Justin Morgan, practicing law just a few short blocks from the court that gave us the resounding critical vendor opinion in KMart, points out that while Jevic provides dicta in support of critical vendor motions, subsequent caselaw continues to put debtors through their paces when seeking to use this theory. 

In Pioneer Health Services,

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Déjà Vu All Over Again: The Ninth Circuit Finds Concrete Injury in Spokeo Remand

Editor’s Note:  The Bankruptcy Cave is just about ready to return from summer vacation (which is our lame way of saying we got really busy with work for actual clients, and blogging just fell by the wayside).  But rest assured, we have a lot of great posts tee’d up for the next several weeks, and The Bankruptcy Cave looks forward to re-joining the cadre of practical, semi-academic, and occasionally critical commentators on restructuring and bankruptcy matters.  In the meantime, here is a great cross-post based on a Bryan Cave client advisory issued last week by our Bryan Cave Consumer Financial Services colleagues Eric Martin and Jonathan NicolSpokeo shows up a lot in consumer class actions, but this Supreme Court opinion is equally important to anyone dealing with FDCPA, FCRA, or other types of claims brought by a Chapter 7 debtor.   

 

On August 15, 2017, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals held once again (“Spokeo III”) that Thomas Robins had standing to assert a claim based upon the Fair Credit Reporting Act (“FCRA”) against Spokeo, Inc., the operator of a website that aggregates public information regarding individuals. 

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Supreme Court Grants Cert on, of all Things, the Standard of Review for Determining Non-Statutory Insider Status

Last December, we updated you that the Supreme Court was considering whether to grant review of In re The Village at Lakeridge, LLC, 814 F.3d 993 (9th Cir. 2016). Our original post is here.  On March 27, 2017, the Supreme Court granted review of Village at Lakeridge, but only as to one question presented, the most boring one in our view.  (Seems like after giving us bankruptcy professionals a thrill with a deep, insightful, and important ruling like Jevic, the Supreme Court is going back to bankruptcy matters that range from the esoteric to the downright irrelevant; oh well.)

In The Village at Lakeridge, a non-statutory insider acquired a $2.76 million claim against the debtor from an insider for $5,000.  Id. at 997.  The debtor attempted to confirm its plan (which included a cramdown of U.S. Bank’s claim) by arguing that the assignee of the insider claim provided the debtor an impaired consenting class.  U.S. Bank moved to designate the assignee’s claim on the basis that he was both a statutory and non-statutory insider, and that the assignment was made in bad faith.  Id. at 997-98.  The bankruptcy court designated the claim and

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Sabine: The Next Episode

Sabine: The Next Episode

April 13, 2017

Authored by: Craig Schuenemann

Editor’s Note: On June 16, 2016, The Bankruptcy Cave gave you our previous summary of the controversial Sabine decision.  When Bankruptcy Judge Chapman determined there was no reason to expedite review of her decisions in the case, we brought you Sabine Lives On (and On) detailing the struggles of Sabine’s midstream adversaries.  Like Hollywood, Bankruptcy Cave knows that sequels sell (with some notable awful exceptions, such as here and here).  We now bring you the third installment of Sabine.  If it sounds like a horror film or slasher flick, it was for the midstream sector.

The bankruptcy court was right!  Judge Rakoff of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York stated starkly: “[T]he bankruptcy court did not err in authorizing the rejection of the Agreements pursuant to 11 U.S.C. § 365(a).  Nordheim challenges the decision only on the ground that the Agreements are real covenants that run with the land, and, since the Court reaches the contrary conclusion; Nordheim’s argument in this regard has no merit.”[i]

Backing up almost a year, on March 9, 2016, Bankruptcy Judge Chapman of the Southern District of

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It’s Not Final, and That’s Final: The Ninth Circuit’s Gugliuzza Decision

appellate court concept with gavel. 3D rendering

As we have noted in another post, Non-Final Finality: Does One Interlocutory Issue Resolved in a Bankruptcy Court Order Render All Issues Addressed in the Order Non-Appealable?, not all orders in bankruptcy cases are immediately appealable as a matter of right.  Only those orders deemed sufficiently “final” may be appealed without additional court authorization.  See 28 U.S.C. § 158(a)(3) (interlocutory order may be appealed only with leave of the court).  Appeals from “final” bankruptcy-court orders usually are first heard by a United States district court or a bankruptcy appellate panel (a “BAP”), which have jurisdiction “to hear appeals from final judgments, orders, and decrees” from bankruptcy courts.  Id. § 158(a)(1).

What happens when a district court or a BAP properly exercises appellate jurisdiction over a bankruptcy court’s order, and ultimately remands the matter back to the bankruptcy court for further fact finding?  Is the district court or BAP’s appellate mandate sufficiently final to appeal as a matter of right to the Circuit Court of Appeals?  The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals recently wrestled with this question in Read More

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